http://www.cleanenergy.org/2013/03/11/protect-florida-waters-from-coal-ash-pollution/

SACE | Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Protect Florida Waters from Coal Ash Pollution!

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Protect Florida Waters from Coal Ash Pollution: Take Action Now!


According to a report from the Environmental Integrity Project, coal ash landfills at Stanton Energy Center near Orlando, FL contains high levels of aluminum, chloride, iron, manganese and sodium.
Photo credit: Angelique Giraud February 2012

Coal ash, the waste left over after coal is burned to generate electricity, contains concentrated amounts of heavy metals such as lead, mercury, arsenic, chromium and selenium, threatening human health and wildlife. Identical pro-coal ash bills S.B. 682 and H.B. 659 are actively moving through the Florida State Legislature right now. These bills pose significant risks to public health and the environment by establishing weak regulations for how coal ash is stored and handled. Please take action today!

Send a letter NOW opposing S.B. 682/H.B. 659 to your representatives!

The bills’ sponsors, Senator Wilton Simpson (R-SD18) and Representative Tom Goodson (R-HD50), claim the bills encourage resource conservation through the “beneficial reuse” of coal ash. However, these bills fail to put appropriate safeguards in place to keep coal ash out of Florida’s waters and communities by:

• Defining “beneficial reuse” broadly, allowing for reuse practices that put coal ash in direct contact with soil and leave it exposed to the elements, threatening ground and surface water.

• Exempting coal ash destined for reuse from certain rules and making restriction of coal ash reuse only on a case-by-case basis.

• Exempting coal ash disposal facilities and landfills from hazardous waste disposal regulations; leaving coal ash in unlined pits close to waterways, polluting the water we rely on for drinking, fishing, agriculture and recreation.

Visit www.southeastcoalash.org to learn more about coal ash and find out if it threatens where you live, work and play.

Please go here now and tellyour representatives that we need to protect our state!

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