SACE | Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Prevent New Vogtle Reactors in Georgia


NEWS: Georgia PSC approves $169 million more for over budget, delayed Vogtle reactors

Feds finalize $8.3 billion taxpayer-backed loan guarantee for over budget, delayed Vogtle reactors as “benefits” of project have fully eroded, expert says at PSC hearing

Georgia Water Coalition Selects Water Guzzling Plant Vogtle for the Dirty Dozen List

stephen_smith_democracy_now_interview_030612.pngJoin Southern Alliance for Clean Energy’s efforts to prevent building new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle in Georgia along the Savannah River. Instead, advocate for safe, clean and affordable energy choices that can reduce global warming pollution while preserving our water resources including energy efficiency and conservation, wind and solar. With an already high reliance on nuclear power in Georgia and electric utilities in the state pushing for expensive, water-intensive new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle, the time is now to take action.

Learn more about the proposed expansion of Plant Vogtle by viewing this DemocracyNow! segment with Southern Alliance for Clean Energy’s executive director, Stephen Smith.


Oppose High Risk Energy

Southern Alliance for Clean Energy has a long history challenging nuclear plant Vogtle in Burke County near Waynesboro, Georgia and that involvement continues as we challenge the proposed expansion at the state and federal level. Plant Vogtle was one of the last and most costly nuclear plants built in the country. Original estimates for four reactors were $660 million. Eventually, only two reactors were built, costing more than $8 billion, resulting at the time in the largest rate hike in Georgia. Unfortunately, Georgia utilities (Southern Company’s Georgia Power, Oglethorpe Power, MEAG and Dalton Utilities) are venturing down this costly and risky path again with plans to build two new Toshiba-Westinghouse AP1000 reactors, a water-guzzling design that has yet to be built or to operate anywhere in the world. The originally estimated $14.1 billion project is now at least 39 months delayed and likely nearly $18 billion, placing enormous risk not only on ratepayers but on U.S. taxpayers given the unfortunate finalization of $8.3 billion in nuclear loan guarantees for Southern Company and its utility partners Oglethorpe Power and MEAG. To learn more about the history of this challenge, please visit our Vogtle Learn About page.